First Sunday after Epiphany – January 10, 2021

Shock, Anger, Fear, Prayer – Pastor Joe’s sermon about January 6th

Children’s Chapel – January 13th – Symbols of Epiphany, Ascension Window

Symbols of Epiphany in the church.    Watch on our Facebook page

24 Pentecost – Possibilities – 5th Stewardship Sermon

Matthew 25:14-30

Jesus said, “It is as if a man, going on a journey, summoned his slaves and entrusted his property to them; to one he gave five talents, to another two, to another one, to each according to his ability. Then he went away. The one who had received the five talents went off at once and traded with them, and made five more talents. In the same way, the one who had the two talents made two more talents. But the one who had received the one talent went off and dug a hole in the ground and hid his master’s money. After a long time the master of those slaves came and settled accounts with them. Then the one who had received the five talents came forward, bringing five more talents, saying, ‘Master, you handed over to me five talents; see, I have made five more talents.’ His master said to him, ‘Well done, good and trustworthy slave; you have been trustworthy in a few things, I will put you in charge of many things; enter into the joy of your master.’ And the one with the two talents also came forward, saying, ‘Master, you handed over to me two talents; see, I have made two more talents.’ His master said to him, ‘Well done, good and trustworthy slave; you have been trustworthy in a few things, I will put you in charge of many things; enter into the joy of your master.’ Then the one who had received the one talent also came forward, saying, ‘Master, I knew that you were a harsh man, reaping where you did not sow, and gathering where you did not scatter seed; so I was afraid, and I went and hid your talent in the ground. Here you have what is yours.’ But his master replied, ‘You wicked and lazy slave! You knew, did you, that I reap where I did not sow, and gather where I did not scatter? Then you ought to have invested my money with the bankers, and on my return I would have received what was my own with interest. So take the talent from him, and give it to the one with the ten talents. For to all those who have, more will be given, and they will have an abundance; but from those who have nothing, even what they have will be taken away. As for this worthless slave, throw him into the outer darkness, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.’”

 

Habits of Grace

Habits of Grace, July 27, 2020: An invitation for you, from Presiding Bishop Curry

[July 27, 2020] As we learn how to adjust our lives given the reality of the coronavirus and the request to do our part to slow its spread by practicing social distancing, I invite you to join me each week to take a moment to cultivate a ‘habit of grace.’  A new meditation will be posted each week. These meditations can be watched at any time by clicking here.

July 27, 2020: Prayer into action

Watch the Video
Earlier this week, I was preparing a very brief meditation for a kind of public service announcement on prayer in the time of pandemic. And as I was preparing, something dawned on me that I wanted to share with you. There are two instances and there may be others to be sure, in both the Hebrew scriptures and in the New Testament where you see prayer linked directly with action.

One example is found in First Kings where the prophet Elijah is fleeing for his life. He, in Chapter 19, says he ends up at a cave near Mount Horeb, which is Mount Sinai in other places. And there for 40 days, he’s in prayer, fasting and struggling. And after that time of prayer, when he kind of senses what God wants him to do, he then goes out and leads a reformation in Israel that was really significant.

His prayer led him to action. You see the same kind of pattern in Jesus in the garden of Gethsemane, he’s praying about what he should do. And that leads him to make the decision to give his life, to show what love looks like for the cause and way of love. But it’s that prayer that leads to action. It occurred to me that in this time of pandemic, it may be helpful to remember that our prayer can lead to actions. We can’t do all the things that we used to do, but we can do some things. We can pray, pray for all of the conditions and all of the situations that we are aware of in our world, and that we are aware of because of this pandemic, but also take some action. There are ways we can support causes that help people in this time.

There are ways that we can support ministries that are helpful, but there’s some simple ways. We can keep social distance. That’s a way of action. It’s an act of prayer. We can pay attention to public health officials and their guidance, that’s an action. And we can wear, of course, these. We can wear these face masks. And so I was trying to think of what is a prayer that combines prayer and action in the Book of Common Prayer? And I found it, there are many, but this one stands out.

It’s the prayer of St. Francis:

Lord make us instruments of your peace. Where there is hatred, let us sow love. Where there is injury, pardon. Where there is discord, union. Where there is doubt, faith. Where there is despair, hope. Where there is darkness, light. Where there is sadness, joy. Grant that we may not so much seek to be consoled as to console, to be understood as to understand, to be loved as to love. For it is in giving that we receive, it is in pardoning that we are pardoned, and it is in dying that we are born to eternal life.

Pray and do what you can.

God love you. God bless you and keep the faith.